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Prostate Cancer Library
Which Men are Classified as High Risk Candidates

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Genetic Fingerprint of Prostate Cancer

Votes:25 Comments:0
Genetic Fingerprint of Prostate Cancer ScienceDaily (Jan. 21, 2009) — One in six American men are diagnosed with prostate cancer within their lifetime and 186,000 will be diagnosed this year. For mos READ MORE
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090116152421.htm

Gay And Bisexual African-American Men Have The Lowest Use Of Prostate Testing

Votes:26 Comments:0
Gay and bisexual black men are less likely to be tested for prostate cancer than men of any other racial and ethnic backgrounds regardless of their sexual orientation, according to a recent study by a READ MORE
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/134146.php

Risk Factors in Prostate Cancer

Votes:39 Comments:0
Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America, affecting 1 in 6 men. The older you are, the more likely you are to be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Although only 1 in 10,000 under ag READ MORE
http://www.prostatecancerfoundation.org/site/c.itIWK2OSG/b.70619/k.446...

Risk Factors in Prostate Cancer

Votes:26 Comments:0
Older age, African American race, and a family history of the disease can all increase the likelihood of a man being diagnosed with the disease. As men increase in age, their risk of developing pro READ MORE
http://www.prostatecancerfoundation.org/site/c.itIWK2OSG/b.189965/k.74...
Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America, affecting 1 in 6 men. The older you are, the more likely you are to be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Although only 1 in 10,000 under age 40 will be diagnosed, the rate shoots up to 1 in 38 for ages 40 to 59, and 1 in 15 for ages 60 to 69. In fact, more than 65% of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65. But the roles of race and family history are important as well. African American men are 61% more likely to develop prostate cancer compared with Caucasian men and are nearly 2.5 times as likely to die from the disease. Men with a single first-degree relative—father, brother or son—with a history of prostate cancer are twice as likely to develop the disease, while those with two or more relatives are nearly four times as likely to be diagnosed. The risk is even higher if the affected family members were diagnosed at a young age, with the highest risk seen in men whose family members were diagnosed before age 60. Although genetics might play a role in deciding why one man might be at higher risk than another, social and environmental factors, particularly diet and lifestyle, likely have an effect as well. In fact, research in the past few years has shown that diet modification might decrease the chances of developing prostate cancer, reduce the likelihood of having a prostate cancer recurrence, or help slow the progression of the disease.
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